Related provisions for MCOB 3A.4.2

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CONC 3.5.6GRP
(1) The representative example in CONC 3.5.5 R should not be limited to being representative of agreements featured in the financial promotion if the firmcommunicating or approving the financial promotion expects other agreements to be entered into as a result of the financial promotion, whether with the firm or with a third party. [Note: paragraph 6.8 of BIS Guidance on regulations implementing the Consumer Credit Directive](1A) Firms are referred to the Glossary definition of
MCOB 3A.1.2GRP
As a result of this chapter and CONC 3:(1) a financial promotion is not subject to CONC 3to the extent that it relates to qualifying credit; and(2) where a firm makes a communication which consists of a financial promotion of qualifying credit and a financial promotion of a different form of lending that is not qualifying credit (for example, an unsecured personal loan), the content of the latter will need to comply with CONC 3.
MCOB 3A.4.3GRP
The requirements of MCOB 3A.4.1 R and MCOB 3A.4.2 G do not prevent, for example, a telephone call centre which has received a call from a customer at an hour generally regarded as unsocial, either responding to that call or asking during the call if the customer would like details of other qualifying credit.
CONC 3.7A.2RRP
(1) A firm must, in any relevant communication, indicate the extent of its powers, in particular whether it works exclusively with one or more lenders (including, for example, if it works exclusively with lenders who are participants in the electronic system that the firm operates) or whether it works as an independent broker.[Note: article 21(a) of the Consumer Credit Directive](2) In this rule, a “relevant communication” means a financial promotion or a document which:(a) is
MCOB 3A.5.1RRP
(1) 1When communicating or approving a financial promotion concerning an MCD regulated mortgage contract which indicates an interest rate or any figures relating to the cost of the credit to the consumer, a firm must ensure that the financial promotion includes standard information which specifies in a clear, concise and prominent way:(a) the identity of the MCD creditor or, where applicable, the creditintermediary or appointed representative;(b) where applicable, that the MCD
MCOB 3A.5.2GRP
Inclusion of a representative example, where required, does not preclude the inclusion of additional cost information, relating to individual products or types of product, subject to this being fair, clear and not misleading. For example, a firm may wish to include a table setting out details of a number of products, for comparative purposes, with the required overall representative example stated (being representative of all agreements expected to result from the financial promotion,
MCOB 5A.3.9GRP
MCOB 5A places no restrictions on the provision of information that is not specific to the amount the consumer wants to borrow. For example, marketing literature, including generic mortgage repayment tables or graphs illustrating the benefits of making a regular overpayment on a flexible mortgage. However, such literature may constitute a financial promotion and be subject to MCOB 3A (Financial promotions and communications with customers).
MCOB 5.4.16GRP
3MCOB 53 places no restrictions on the provision of information that is not specific to the amount the customer wants to borrow, for example, marketing literature including generic mortgage repayment tables or graphs illustrating the benefits of making a regular overpayment on a flexible mortgage. Such literature may, however, constitute a financial promotion2 and be subject to the provisions of MCOB 3A4(Financial promotions and communications with customers).424
SYSC 13.3.1AGRP
3The following is a non-exhaustive list of rules and guidance in the Handbook that are relevant to a firm's management of operational risk: (1) COBS contains rules and guidance that can relate to the management of operational risk; for example, COBS 2 (Conduct of business obligations), COBS 4 (Communicating with clients, including financial promotions), COBS 6 (Information about the firm, its services and remuneration), COBS 7 (Insurance mediation), COBS 9 (Suitability (including
PERG 2.4.5GRP
A person who is based outside the United Kingdom but who sets up an establishment in the United Kingdom must therefore consider the following matters. First, he must not, unless he is authorised, carry on regulated activities in the United Kingdom. Second, unless he is authorised, the day-to-day management of the carrying on of the regulated activity must not be the responsibility of the UK establishment. This may, for example, affect those UK establishments that in the context
SYSC 4 Annex 1GRP

Business areas and management functions

Explanation

(1) Payment services

This means:

(1) payment services;

(2) issuing and administering other means of payment (for example, cheques and bankers' drafts);

(3) issuing electronic money; and

(4) current accounts.

(2) Settlement

This means clearing and settlement of any transactions described in rows (3) and (6) to (9) of this annex, in relation to the assets covered by (9).

It also includes clearing and settlement of any transactions described in row (10).

(3) Investment management

This has the same meaning as managing investments with the following adjustments:

(a) it covers all types of assets; and

(b) the exclusions in the Regulated Activities Order do not apply.

It also covers fund management.

(4) Financial or investment advice

This includes advising on investments.

(5) Mortgage advice

This has the same meaning as advising on regulated mortgage contracts but is expanded to cover land anywhere in the world and to cover security of any kind over land.

(6) Corporate investments

This means acquiring, holding, managing and disposing a firm's investments made for its own account.

(7) Wholesale sales

This means the selling of any investment to a person other than a retail customer.

It does not include the activities in (1).

(8) Retail sales

This means the selling of any investment to a retail customer.

It includes savings accounts. It does not include the activities in (1).

(9) Trading for clients

This means dealing in investments as agent and execution of orders on behalf of clients but the list of products includes money market instruments and foreign exchange.

(10) Market making

This has the same meaning as it does in MIFID (see the definition of market maker in article 4.1(8)).

(11) Investment research

(12) Origination/syndication and underwriting

Origination and syndication include:

(1) entering into or acquiring (directly or indirectly) any commitment or investment with a view to transferring some or all of it to others, or with a view to others investing in the same transaction;

(2) sub-participation; and

(3) any transaction described in the Glossary definition of originator.

Underwriting includes underwriting that is not on a firm commitment basis.

A commitment or investment includes an economic interest in some or all of it.

This activity also includes the provision of services relating to such transactions.

(13) Retail lending decisions

Deciding whether, and on what terms, to lend to retail customers.

Lending includes granting credit, leasing and hire (including finance leasing).

(14) Wholesale lending decisions

Deciding whether, and on what terms, to lend to persons who are not retail customers.

Lending includes granting credit, leasing and hire (including finance leasing).

(15) Design and manufacturing of products intended for wholesale customers

Wholesale customers mean persons who are not retail customers

(16) Design and manufacture of products intended for retail customers

(17) Production and distribution of marketing materials and communications

This includes financial promotions

(18) Customer service

This means dealing with clients after the point of sale, including queries and fulfilment of client requests

(19) Customer complaints handling

This includes the firm's compliance with DISP.

It also includes:

(1) any similar procedures relating to activities that do not come under the jurisdiction of the Financial Ombudsman Service;

(2) activities that take place outside the UK; and

(3) activities that are not subject to any ombudsman service.

(20) Collection and recovering amounts owed to a firm by its customers

Dealing with customers in arrears

‘Customer’ means any person falling into any of the definitions of client in the Glossary so far as they apply to the FCA's Handbook. The definition is extended to cover all services provided by the firm and not just those that are provided in the course of carrying on a regulated activity or an ancillary service.

(21) Middle office

This means risk management and controls in relation to, and accounting for, transactions in securities or derivatives

(22) The firm's information technology

(23) Business continuity planning

This means the functions described in SYSC 4.1.6R and SYSC 4.1.7R

(24) Human resources

This includes recruitment, training and competence and performance monitoring

(25) Incentive schemes for the firm's staff

This is not limited to schemes based on sales.

(26) Providing information in relation to a specified benchmark

(27) Administering a specified benchmark

Note (1): The purpose of this annex is explained in SYSC 4.5 (Management responsibilities maps for UK2 relevant authorised persons) and SYSC 4.7.37G. This annex is also referred to in SYSC 4.6 (Management responsibilities maps for non-UK relevant authorised persons) and SYSC 4.8 (Senior management responsibilities for third-country relevant authorised persons: allocation of responsibilities) (see SYSC 4.6.14 and SYSC 4.8.35).2

Note (2): A firm does not have to use the split of activities in this annex for the purposes in Note (1). If a firm does decide to use it, it may adapt it to suit its management arrangements better.

For example, a firm may find the split of activities into retail and wholesale activities unsuitable. If so, the firm might:

(a) treat retail and wholesale activities together; or

(b) use its own definition of retail and wholesale activities.