Related provisions for DEPP 4.1.6

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DEPP 4.1.1GRP
1All statutory notice decisions under executive procedures will be taken either by a senior staff committee or by an individual FSA staff member.
DEPP 4.1.2GRP
In either case, the decision will be taken by FSA staff who have not been directly involved in establishing the evidence on which the decision is based, except in accordance with section 395(3) of the Act.
DEPP 4.1.3GRP
The FSA's senior executive committee will from time to time determine that particular categories of statutory notice decision to be taken under executive procedures will be taken by a senior staff committee.
DEPP 4.1.4GRP
A senior staff committee will consist of such FSA staff members as the FSA's senior executive committee may from time to time determine. The FSA's senior executive committee may authorise the chairman of a senior staff committee to select its other members. A senior staff committee is accountable for its decisions to the FSA's senior executive committee and, through it, to the FSA Board.
DEPP 4.1.5GRP
A senior staff committee may operate through standing or specific sub-committees to consider particular decisions or classes of decision, for which accountability will lie through the committee. Each meeting of a senior staff committee, or sub-committee, will include:(1) an individual with authority to act as its chairman; and(2) at least two other members.
DEPP 4.1.7GRP
Statutory notice decisions to be taken under executive procedures, and not falling within the responsibility of a senior staff committee, will be taken by an individual FSA staff member. The decision will be:(1) made by an executive director of the FSA Board or his delegate (who will be of at least the level of associate);(2) on the recommendation of an FSA staff member of at least the level of associate; and(3) with the benefit of legal advice from an FSA staff member of at least
DEPP 4.1.10GRP
If an individual responsible for a decision under executive procedures (or a more senior FSA staff member with responsibilities in relation to the decision concerned) considers that it warrants collective consideration, the individual may:(1) take the decision himself, following consultation with other FSA staff members, as above; or(2) refer it to a senior staff committee, which will take the decision itself.
DEPP 4.1.11GRP
(1) FSAstaff are required by their contract of employment to comply with a code of conduct which imposes strict rules to cover the handling of conflicts of interest which may arise from personal interests or associations. FSA staff subject to a conflict of interest must declare that interest to the person to whom they are immediately responsible for a decision.(2) If a member of a senior staff committee has a potential conflict of interest in any matter in which he is asked to
DEPP 4.1.12GRP
The secretariat to the senior staff committee will record and document all disclosures of potential conflicts of interest and the steps taken to manage them.
DEPP 4.1.13GRP
The procedure for taking decisions under executive procedures will generally be less formal and structured than that for decisions by the RDC. Broadly, however, FSA staff responsible for taking statutory notice decisions under executive procedures will follow a procedure similar to that described at DEPP 3.2.7 G to DEPP 3.2.27 G for the RDC except that:(1) in a case where the decision will be taken by a senior staff committee: (a) the chairman or deputy chairman of the senior
DEPP 5.1.1GRP
(1) 1A person subject to enforcement action may agree to a financial penalty or other outcome rather than contest formal action by the FSA.(2) The fact that he does so will not usually obviate the need for a statutory notice recording the FSA's decision to take that action. Where, however, the person subject to enforcement action agrees not to contest the content of a proposed statutory notice, the decision to give that statutory notice will be taken by senior FSA staff.(3) The
DEPP 2.5.18GRP
Some of the distinguishing features of notices given under enactments other than the Act are as follows: (1) Building Societies Act 1986, section 36A: There is no right to refer a decision to issue a prohibition order under section 36A to the Tribunal. Accordingly, a decision notice under section 36A(5A) is not required to give an indication of whether any such right exists. A decision notice under section 36A(5A) may only relate to the issue of a prohibition order under section
DEPP 4.2.1GRP
If FSA staff recommend that action be taken and they consider that the decision falls within the responsibility of a senior staff committee:(1) in general the FSA staff's recommendation will go before the senior staff committee;(2) in urgent statutory notice cases for which a senior staff committee is responsible, the decision to give the statutory notice may be taken by the chairman or, if he is unavailable, a deputy chairman of the senior staff committee, and, if it is practicable,
DEPP 4.2.2GRP
In the circumstances described in DEPP 4.2.1 G (4) the FSA considers that it may be necessary for an FSA director of division or member of a senior staff committee to take the decision to give a supervisory notice even if he has been involved in establishing the evidence on which the decision is based, as permitted by section 395(3) of the Act. Where practicable, however, FSA staff will seek to ensure that the FSA director or committee member has not been so involved.
SUP 3.10.8CGRP
1It is the responsibility of an insurance intermediary's senior management to determine, on a continuing basis, whether the firm is an exempt insurance intermediary for the purposes of this requirement and to appoint an auditor if management determines the firm is no longer exempt. SUP 3.7 (amplified by SUP 15) sets out what a firm should consider when deciding whether it should notify the FSA of matters raised by its auditor.
SYSC 3.2.16GRP
9(1) Depending on the nature, scale and complexity of its business, it may be appropriate for a firm to delegate much of the task of monitoring the appropriateness and effectiveness of its systems and controls to an internal audit function. An internal audit function should have clear responsibilities and reporting lines to an audit committee or appropriate senior manager, be adequately resourced and staffed by competent individuals, be independent of the day-to-day activities
DEPP 3.1.2GRP
(1) The RDC is separate from the FSA's executive management structure. Apart from its Chairman, none of the members of the RDC is an FSAemployee.(2) All members of the RDC are appointed for fixed periods by the FSA Board. The FSA Board may remove a member of the RDC, but only in the event of that member's misconduct or incapacity.
DEPP 6.5A.2GRP
(1) The FSA will determine a figure that reflects the seriousness of the breach. In many cases, the amount of revenue generated by a firm from a particular product line or business area is indicative of the harm or potential harm that its breach may cause, and in such cases the FSA will determine a figure which will be based on a percentage of the firm’s revenue from the relevant products or business areas. The FSA also believes that the amount of revenue generated by a firm from
DEPP 6.5A.3GRP
(1) The FSA may increase or decrease the amount of the financial penalty arrived at after Step 2, but not including any amount to be disgorged as set out in Step 1, to take into account factors which aggravate or mitigate the breach. Any such adjustments will be made by way of a percentage adjustment to the figure determined at Step 2.(2) The following list of factors may have the effect of aggravating or mitigating the breach:(a) the conduct of the firm in bringing (or failing
REC 2.4.5GRP
In assessing whether its connection with any person could affect whether a UK recognised body is a fit and proper person, the FSA may have regard to:(1) the reputation and standing of that other person, including his standing with any relevant UK or overseas regulator;(2) breaches of any law or regulation by that other person; (3) the roles of any of the UK recognised body's key individuals who have a position within organisations under the control or influence of that other person,