Related provisions for BIPRU 12.5.64

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BIPRU 12.5.12RRP
For the purpose of BIPRU 12.5.11R, a firm must assume that the second liquidity stress is characterised by:(1) uncertainty as to the accuracy of the valuation attributed to that firm's assets and those of its counterparties;(2) inability to realise, or ability to realise only at excessive cost, particular classes of assets, including those which represent claims on other participants in the financial markets or which were originated by them;(3) uncertainty as to the ability of
BIPRU 12.5.32GRP
For the purpose of BIPRU 12.5.31R, the appropriate regulator would expect a firm, in relation to each payment or settlement system in which it participates directly, to provide details of:(1) that firm's charges for providing intra-day credit;(2) any collateral requirements which it applies to its customers;(3) the credit limits that it imposes (and the circumstances, if any, in which credit may be provided notwithstanding a limit breach);(4) the extent to which the customers
BIPRU 12.5.56RRP
For the purpose of assessing its exposure to marketable assets risk, a firm must assess how the marketable assets comprised in its liquidity resources will behave:(1) under normal financial conditions; and(2) under the liquidity stresses identified in BIPRU 12.5.6R, including an assessment of the effect of these stresses on:(a) its ability to derive funding from its marketable assets in a timely fashion;(b) the potential for using those assets as collateral to raise secured funding
BIPRU 12.5.57GRP
In complying with BIPRU 12.5.56R, a firm should consider all marketable assets which count towards its liquidity resources for the purposes of meeting the overall liquidity adequacy rule. A firm should therefore include in this assessment any assets that it holds in its liquid assets buffer.
BIPRU 12.5.58GRP
The appropriate regulator regards as marketable those of a firm's assets that it is able to sell outright or repo. For liquidity management purposes, a firm would ordinarily expect to hold a stock of assets of this kind in order to reduce the likelihood that it may need to borrow unsecured at short notice. To the extent that these assets may behave differently under stress conditions than under normal financial conditions, a firm is subject to marketable assets risk.
BIPRU 12.5.61GRP
In considering its operational capability to generate funding from assets, a firm should be aware that its capability in this regard is likely to depend on:(1) whether it has in place arrangements for repo;(2) the extent to which that firm already holds a significant proportion of the market for the marketable asset in question;(3) the extent to which that firm periodically realises some or all of its holdings of that asset; and(4) that firm's accounting treatment and valuation
BIPRU 12.5.62RRP
For the purpose of its ILAA submission to the appropriate regulator, a firm must provide the appropriate regulator with an analysis of the profile of its marketable assets as at the date of submission in a way that:(1) separately identifies its marketable assets according to asset class, maturity, currency, their eligibility for use in central bank monetary operations and liquidity facilities and any other characteristic that it uses in its liquidity management; and(2) assesses
BIPRU 12.5.63RRP
For the purpose of assessing its exposure to non-marketable assets risk, a firm must assess how the non-marketable assets in its liquidity resources will behave:(1) under normal financial conditions; and(2) under the liquidity stresses required by BIPRU 12.5.6 R, including an assessment of the effect of these stresses on:(a) the firm's ability to derive funding from its non-marketable assets; and(b) the impact on the firm's liquidity position of any consequences for its funding
BIPRU 12.5.65GRP
BIPRU 12.2.5 G notes that a firm should include in its liquidity resources sufficient assets which are marketable or otherwise realisable. The appropriate regulator considers those assets which are capable of realisation, but other than through repo or outright sale, as non-marketable assets. To the extent that these assets may behave differently under stress conditions than under normal financial conditions, a firm is subject to non-marketable assets risk. Different forms of
BIPRU 12.5.66GRP
In addition to realising a firm's marketable assets, a firm can meet its outflows in part by expected inflows from maturing non-marketable assets such as retail loans. Inflows from these assets (principal and interest) may in stressed conditions be affected by counterparty behaviour, exposing that firm to non-marketable assets risk.
BIPRU 12.5.67RRP
For the purpose of assessing its exposure to non-marketable assets risk a firm must assess the extent to which the behaviour of inflows from retail loans under the liquidity stresses required by BIPRU 12.5.6R may differ from that suggested by their contractual terms.
BIPRU 12.5.68GRP
For the purpose of the assessment in BIPRU 12.5.67R, a firm should ensure that it assesses repayment behaviour at a level of granularity sufficient to enable it to draw informed conclusions about its liquidity exposure. The appropriate regulator would expect a firm's assessment to analyse separately the non-marketable assets risk associated with each of its relevant products and with each type of counterparty from whom it is expecting repayments.
BIPRU 12.5.70GRP
A firm may also use its unsecured wholesale assets to generate liquidity, otherwise than by outright sale or repo. A firm may, for example, choose to generate funding from some of the assets included in its liquidity resources by using them in securitisation or covered bond programmes. Assets that are typically used to raise liquidity in this manner include residential mortgage loans; commercial mortgage and other loans; credit card and automobile receivables, which have been
BIPRU 12.5.73GRP
A firm which chooses to warehouse assets in the way described in BIPRU 12.5.72R should consider the particular risks that arise from the method of financing that it uses to pre-fund those assets. For example, financing of warehoused assets by means of short-term (rather than long-term) funding is more likely to put that firm under liquidity pressure in the event that its proposed securitisation is not completed (either at all, or at the expected date).
BIPRU 12.3.22BRRP
2A firm must also have regard to existing legal, regulatory and operational limitations to potential transfers of liquidity and unencumbered assets amongst entities, both within and outside the EEA.[Note: article 86(6) of the CRD]4
BIPRU 12.3.25ERP
(1) A firm should ensure that its arrangements for the management of liquidity risk:(a) enable it to monitor shifts between intra-day and overnight or term collateral usage;(b) enable it to appropriately adjust its calculation of available collateral to account for assets that are part of a tied hedge;(c) include adequate consideration of the potential for uncertainty around, or disruption to, intra-day asset flows; and(d) take into account the potential for additional collateral
BIPRU 12.2.5GRP
For the purposes of the overall liquidity adequacy rule, liquidity resources are not confined to the amount or value of a firm's marketable, or otherwise realisable, assets. Rather, in assessing the adequacy of those resources, a firm should have regard to the overall character of the resources available to it which enable it to meet its liabilities as they fall due. Therefore, for the purposes of that rule, a firm should ensure that:(1) it holds sufficient assets which are
BIPRU 12.2.18GRP
After completing a review of the ILAA as part of the SLRP, the appropriate regulator will give a standard ILAS BIPRU firmindividual liquidity guidance, advising it of the amount and quality of liquidity resources which the appropriate regulator considers are appropriate having regard to the liquidity risk profile of the firm. In giving individual liquidity guidance, the appropriate regulator will also advise the firm of what it considers to be a prudent funding profile for the
BIPRU 12.9.4GRP
As part of the SLRP, the appropriate regulator will give a standard ILAS BIPRU firmindividual liquidity guidance advising it of the amount and quality of liquidity resources which the appropriate regulator considers are appropriate, having regard to the liquidity risk profile of that firm. In giving individual liquidity guidance, the appropriate regulator will also advise the firm of what it considers to be a prudent funding profile for the firm. In giving the firmindividual liquidity
BIPRU 12.6.6ARRP
2For the purpose of BIPRU 12.6.6 R, a firm must calculate:(1) its total assets by reference to its most recent FSA001 data item; and (2) its retail loans as the total of its lending to the retail sector recorded in cell 11A in its most recent FSA015 data item.
BIPRU 12.6.18RRP
(1) Subject to (3), a simplified ILAS BIPRU firm that has assets or liabilities denominated in either or both euros and United States dollars must carry out separate calculations under BIPRU 12.6.9Rin relation to its positions in each of those currencies, in addition to that which it carries out in relation to its sterling positions (if any).(2) A firm to which (1) applies must ensure that, for the purpose of meeting the simplified buffer requirement, it holds in its liquid assets
IFPRU 2.3.44GRP
When assessing liquidity risk, a firm should consider the extent to which there is a mismatch between assets and liabilities.
IFPRU 2.3.46GRP
Some further areas to consider in developing the liquidity risk scenario might include: (1) any mismatching between expected asset and liability cash flows;(2) the inability to sell assets quickly; (3) the extent to which a firm's assets have been pledged; and (4) the possible need to reduce large asset positions at different levels of market liquidity and the related potential costs and timing constraints.
IFPRU 2.3.64GRP
Where a securities firm deals in illiquid securities (eg, unlisted securities or securities listed on illiquid markets) or holds illiquid assets, potentially large losses can arise from trades that have failed to settle or because of large unrealised market losses. Therefore, a securities firm may consider the impact of liquidity risk on its exposure to: (1) credit risk; and(2) market risk.
BIPRU 2.2.35GRP
When assessing liquidity risk, a firm should consider the extent to which there is a mismatch between assets and liabilities.
BIPRU 2.2.37GRP
Some further areas to consider in developing the liquidity risk scenario might include:(1) any mismatching between expected asset and liability cash flows;(2) the inability to sell assets quickly;(3) the extent to which a firm's assets have been pledged; and(4) the possible need to reduce large asset positions at different levels of market liquidity and the related potential costs and timing constraints.
BIPRU 2.2.67GRP
Where a securities firm deals in illiquid securities (for example, unlisted securities or securities listed on illiquid markets), or holds illiquid assets, potentially large losses can arise from trades that have failed to settle or because of large unrealised market losses. A securities firm may therefore consider the impact of liquidity risk on its exposure to:(1) credit risk; and(2) market risk.
BIPRU 7.10.55IRRP
3The liquidity horizon for a securitisation warehouse must reflect the time to build, sell and securitise the assets, or to hedge the material risk factors, under stressed market conditions.
BIPRU 12.7.1GRP
BIPRU 12.2 provides that an ILAS BIPRU firm must ensure that its liquidity resources contain an adequate buffer of high quality, unencumbered assets. BIPRU 12.7 describes in more detail the nature of the assets that are eligible for inclusion in that buffer. The rules in this section provide that some types of assets are eligible for use only by a simplified ILAS BIPRU firm.
BIPRU 12.7.8GRP
In deciding on the precise composition of its liquid assets buffer, a firm should ensure that it tailors the contents of the buffer to the needs of its business and the liquidity risk that it faces. In particular, a firm should ensure that it holds assets in its buffer which can be realised with the speed necessary to meet its liabilities as they fall due. In doing so, a firm should have regard to the currencies in which its liabilities are denominated and should take into account
IFPRU 4.12.42GRP
Where a firm achieves significant risk transfer for a particular transaction, the FCA expects it to continue to monitor risks related to the transaction to which it may still be exposed. The firm should consider capital planning implications of securitised assets returning to its balance sheet. The EU CRR requires a firm to conduct regular stress testing of its securitisation activities and off-balance sheet exposures. The stress tests should consider the firm-wide impact of stressed
IFPRU 4.15.1GRP
For purposes of repurchase transactions and securities lending or borrowing transactions, the FCA does not consider that there are any core market participants apart from those entities listed in article 227(3) of the EU CRR.
DTR 4.1.11RRP
The management report required by DTR 4.1.8 R must also give an indication of:(1) any important events that have occurred since the end of the financial year unless those events are:4(a) 4reflected in the issuer’s profit and loss account or balance sheet; or(b) 4disclosed in the notes to the issuer’s audited financial statements;(2) the issuer's likely future development;(3) activities in the field of research and development;(4) the information concerning acquisitions of own
COLL 5.7.11GRP
An authorised fund manager carrying out due diligence for the purpose of the rules in this section should make enquiries or otherwise obtain information needed to enable him properly to consider:(1) whether the experience, expertise, qualifications and professional standing of the second scheme's investment manager is adequate for the type and complexity of the second scheme;(2) the adequacy of the regulatory, legal and accounting regimes applicable to the second scheme and its